Being Miss Maumee Valley

Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Springboard! Session 10: Opening the Bidding

What is Springboard!? Click here.

Today’s learning outcomes: Examining Values, Creative Problem Solving, Participation and Self-Assurance

I enjoy this part of the semester, as it moves into helping the freshmen acknowledge the values that shape who they are and the decisions they make. As a coach, I like to encourage whoever I’m mentoring to be open to the fact that their values are likely to change as they progress through their college experience.

We began the session with a great but challenging exercise. We stood and the middle of the room represented literally.. the middle, whereas on end of the room was “extremely agree” and the other “extremely disagree.” Our session leader would then read statements like “marijuana should be legalized.” Then you were to physically move to the section of the room that showed your stance. (The middle could also mean you were indifferent of didn’t want to answer.) Many issues like homosexuality and gun control were split, while I’m glad that my entire class agreed that racism is still a problematic issue in our society. Interestingly, all but one person said that premarital sex was “okay;” the one woman who disagreed did so because she comes from a culture which completely shuns and disowns single mothers.

Moving on, we were given a grid with the following thirty values. We were asked to cross off ten that were not as important to us, noting the first we cut. Then, difficultly, ten more have to go! With only ten values left, we have to eliminate five more, thus creating a top five. As if that’s not hard enough, a top five must go down to a top three, noting the number one most important value. The values are:

justice
peace
independence
recognition
spirituality
financial security
happiness
family
responsibility
popularity
wealth,
prestige
affection
freedom
loyalty
power
pleasure
integrity
honesty
learning
comfort
security
wisdom
health
adventure
order
relationships
creativity
intelligence
respect

We then go around the room and state our most important and first to go… I’ve done this several times and “happiness” has always been number one; however, an overwhelming majority of my classmates selected “Family.” The only value eliminated first by multiple classmates was “Popularity.” (Our workbook states this activity was adapted from “Discovering Your Purpose” by Ivey Haley.)

Finally, we had a Values Auction.

Freshman and coaches are given a hypothetical thousand dollars and a list of 24 item to be sold at auction. First, we budget our money, then we have the auction!

Items include:
A world in which everything is fair
to win the lottery
to get paid to do what you love
to be on a reality tv show
to feel completely loved by those around you
a long and healthy life, unlimited money to help the poor
international fame, a world free of crime
to spend a day with Jesus or Buddah or Allah, etc…,
to instantly have your bachelor’s degree
a world free of prejudice, to cure cancer
happy healthy children
to be the wisest person in the world
and so on...

Clearly, this is not to assign monetary values to these things, but to examine what is most important to you, as you are at an auction. As in years past, I went straight to the $1000 bid to ensure I got “a world free of prejudice.” Other classmates did the same for “the ability to cure cancer,” “to have happy, healthy children” and “a satisfying, loving marriage/relationship.”

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